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Crane Technologies Blog

By 7019376391 19 Sep, 2017
The usage of cranes in the construction and manufacturing industry plays a vital role in the way companies function. Crane systems allow for a more effortless and safer operation when transporting products and bulk materials. However, what happens when the very machine that is suppose to make a job easier and safer, no longer is safe? How does an operator determine the safety of a crane?
Regardless of the benefits that these machines bring about, there is still a great risk of injury when proper precautions are failed to be made. Preventive measures should be on any crane operator’s agenda, which is why it is important to acknowledge the potential hazards and to take safety procedures seriously. Standard safety inspections are more than just for compliance of regulation: they are potential life saving procedures.
There are a multitude of cranes available on the market, and with the large variety comes many opportunities for accidents. Safety inspections are, of course, done to comply with government standards, as well as company standards. Even so, those compliance procedures leave very little room for error. According to OSHA 1910.179 , frequent and periodic inspections are required for the proper function of crane systems, regardless of the type. These inspections ensure that cracks aren’t developing due to excessive wear, electrical wires running through the crane are not compromised, bolts are not loose, and the list goes on. Any crane defects could lead to injury if an operator failed to correct these findings during a routine safety inspection.
By 7019376391 10 Aug, 2017
Crane Technologies has recently finished a job on a Crane run way system for General Dynamics Land Systems.  We are proud to have offered our service to a company that designs, produces, and sustains our military vehicles.  

 

By 7019376391 17 Jul, 2017
OSHA announced that it will exclude monorail hoists from the requirements of the cranes and derricks in construction standards as long as employers meet other agency requirements.

According to a news release, the policy change came in response to comments from stakeholders and in recognition that a monorail hoist—which is attached to a fixed monorail mounted on trucks or scaffolding systems—is significantly different from other cranes and derricks in construction. Hoists are used to lift mechanical equipment, precast concrete components, and storage tanks.

OSHA explains that some monorail hoists can be extended and contracted in only a fixed, horizontal direction. They do not rotate, swing on a hinge, or boom out much farther than the equipment to which they are mounted.

Under the announced policy, OSHA will not cite employers for failing to meet the requirements of Subpart CC if they meet the requirements of the overhead hoists and general training standards. General industry requirements for monorail hoists are not changed.

“This enforcement policy is a commonsense approach to addressing industry concerns while also ensuring workers are protected,” said Dean McKenzie, director of OSHA’s Directorate of Construction.


Crane Technologies Blog

By 7019376391 19 Sep, 2017
The usage of cranes in the construction and manufacturing industry plays a vital role in the way companies function. Crane systems allow for a more effortless and safer operation when transporting products and bulk materials. However, what happens when the very machine that is suppose to make a job easier and safer, no longer is safe? How does an operator determine the safety of a crane?
Regardless of the benefits that these machines bring about, there is still a great risk of injury when proper precautions are failed to be made. Preventive measures should be on any crane operator’s agenda, which is why it is important to acknowledge the potential hazards and to take safety procedures seriously. Standard safety inspections are more than just for compliance of regulation: they are potential life saving procedures.
There are a multitude of cranes available on the market, and with the large variety comes many opportunities for accidents. Safety inspections are, of course, done to comply with government standards, as well as company standards. Even so, those compliance procedures leave very little room for error. According to OSHA 1910.179 , frequent and periodic inspections are required for the proper function of crane systems, regardless of the type. These inspections ensure that cracks aren’t developing due to excessive wear, electrical wires running through the crane are not compromised, bolts are not loose, and the list goes on. Any crane defects could lead to injury if an operator failed to correct these findings during a routine safety inspection.
By 7019376391 10 Aug, 2017
Crane Technologies has recently finished a job on a Crane run way system for General Dynamics Land Systems.  We are proud to have offered our service to a company that designs, produces, and sustains our military vehicles.  

 

By 7019376391 17 Jul, 2017
OSHA announced that it will exclude monorail hoists from the requirements of the cranes and derricks in construction standards as long as employers meet other agency requirements.

According to a news release, the policy change came in response to comments from stakeholders and in recognition that a monorail hoist—which is attached to a fixed monorail mounted on trucks or scaffolding systems—is significantly different from other cranes and derricks in construction. Hoists are used to lift mechanical equipment, precast concrete components, and storage tanks.

OSHA explains that some monorail hoists can be extended and contracted in only a fixed, horizontal direction. They do not rotate, swing on a hinge, or boom out much farther than the equipment to which they are mounted.

Under the announced policy, OSHA will not cite employers for failing to meet the requirements of Subpart CC if they meet the requirements of the overhead hoists and general training standards. General industry requirements for monorail hoists are not changed.

“This enforcement policy is a commonsense approach to addressing industry concerns while also ensuring workers are protected,” said Dean McKenzie, director of OSHA’s Directorate of Construction.


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